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Archive for the ‘Hamilton’ Category

Water tower by the Kwianis Park.

Water tower by the Kwianis Park.

I know the sky has a red tint to it but  it does looks like a sandstorm is blowing in. Actually it was a nice day. I’ve been having trouble with the network today so this is going to be a short post.

Check out The Sky Watch Blog.

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Today’s My World Tuesday features photos from Hamilton most taken prior to 1950.

Rice Street, West side of Courthouse Square, Hamilton

Rice Street, West side of Courthouse Square, Hamilton. The picture is from a postcard supplied by H. L. Griffith, Griffith is a descendant of Jesse Jones Griffith, First Treasurer of Hamilton County, TX.

Southside of Hamilton Square prior to 1930.

South side of Hamilton Square prior to 1930. The Wm. Connolly & Co. Groceries & Dry Goods store can be seen on the left. Notice that the street has both cars and horse drawn wagons. Contributed by H.L. Griffith.

Hope you enjoyed this little jaunt back in time.

Be sure to visit the That’s My World! blog.

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Hamilton Mill & Elevator Company

Burned in the 1940's and the Wieser family moved their milling business to Lampasas where there was a railroad.  The abandoned structure still stands on South Railroad Street, north of Kooken Field.

Burned in the 1940's and the Wieser family moved their milling business to Lampasas where there was a railroad. The abandoned structure still stands on South Railroad Street, north of Kooken Field.

McKINLEY-CORRIGAN GROCERY STORE

George Thomas "Tom" Smith, Sr.,    ?  ,    ?   , Jesse Smith,   ?  Shared  by Norene Brian Walls

Left-Right: George Thomas "Tom" Smith, Sr., ? , ? , Jesse Smith, ? Shared by Norene Brian Walls

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Jack’s Self Service Grocery

Contributed by Tom Leeth

Contributed by Tom Leeth

Robert Vernon “Jack” Leeth  entered business on his own in Hamilton  in 1926 at age 19, as the owner and manager of the 1st Cash and Carry Grocery in Hamilton–Jack’s Self-Service Grocery-.  Until this store opened, all grocery shopping was done by bringing or calling grocery lists to the grocery store for employees to fill.

Hamilton Market

Jack Leeth built the Hamilton Market place around 1933 or 1934. Photo from Tom Leeth

Jack Leeth built the Hamilton Market place around 1933 or 1934. Photo from Tom Leeth

Jack built this store about 1933-34. He ran it as Hamilton Market Place until late 1930s when Clinton Leeth, Jack’s cousin joined him and opened L & L Auto Supply.  Along in the early 40s, Jack sold the building to Clinton.  During the war years it was terribly difficult to get merchandise to sell and it eventually went out of business in this location.  He later went into the feed and seed business and was located in several different locations over the years until his death in 1972.

Note the unique motto:  “We buy what you have to sell; we sell what you have to buy.”  The first part of the motto appears on the sign toward the left (north) end of the building. The other part of the motto appears on the south end of the Hamilton Market Place sign.

You can also see the sign for the Ice Plant just at the north end of the Hamilton Market Place building.  Not visible in the picture, but located south of the building was the old steam laundry which was run for a number of years by the Havens family.  Their son, Bill, was a 1948 graduate of Hamilton High school.

Photo Contributed by Jack's son Tom Leeth.

Photo Contributed by Jack's son Tom Leeth.

An alternate picture which is a bit lighter and might print better.   The other picture would obviously been on a Saturday when every farmer near and far came to town, many to sell their eggs, cream, butter, pecans, wool, mohair and even the dreaded skunk pelt. Jack would then load all these purchases up and take them to Fort Worth on Saturday night to either Swift and Company or Armour and Company. — ECW

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Misner Hotel

Edwin Ruthvin & Sarah Elizabeth (Collett) Misener operated this hotel in Hamilton for many years.  Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker

Edwin Ruthvin & Sarah Elizabeth (Collett) Misener operated this hotel in Hamilton for many years. Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker

Smith-Harris Lumber Co

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Smith-Harris Lumber Company before 1912. Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker.

Charles Martin Hickman was an accountant with this firm

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church is in the left background, and a Hamilton School building is in the right background.  The rock fence in the foreground  remains in front of the house built in 1872 by Francis Marion Graves on what is now West Ross Street.

Between the two Smith-Harris Lumber Company Buildings is a Rock Island Railroad car on the Stephenville North and South Texas Railroad Tracks.  The SN & ST Railroad depot is behind the Smith-Harris Lumber Company Building on the left.

Haskell Harelik Dry Goods

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Excerpt from the 1938 Pioneer Edition Hamilton County News, Vol 8 No. & The Carlton Citizen, Vol. 30 No. 23, Originally published Friday, 24 June  1938, W. F. Billingslea, Publisher, Hamilton County, TX:

During these 27 years we have had business contact with 90 per cent of the people of Hamilton County at some time or other.  We located here with the idea of making this our permanent home and started in a small way.  In every business transaction since that time we have endeavored to make each buyer a satisfied customer by giving him 100 cents in valuable merchandise for every dollar spent with us and rendering prompt and efficient service.  This has paid us dividends in increased business and made us many friends throughout the territory.  We appreciate this and in return will continue to serve you with “The Best At the Least Possible Cost.”

From Milton Harelik, 6 August 2002: Milton Harelik is the son of Haskell Harlik. Milton’s son Mark wrote a play The Immigrant based upon his Grandfather’s life.

The Harelik Store history dates back to 19ll when Mr. Perry rented a north side building to Papa when he opened up his grocery store. That was in the era when all the north side saloons were closed and there were a few empty buildings. In 1924 he bought out a Mrs. Paul Harelik who was running what they called “The Racket Store”. Her husband, a 3rd cousin of Papa’s had died the previous year and she decided to move to San Francisco. Then in 1939, (before #WW2) a decision was made to remodel the store and Mrs. Ethel Kooken (Dr. Kooken’s mother) offered to build a place to our specifications and we moved to the north side in 1940. Mark’s  story about Papa depicts a lot of that history in his play, The Immigrant.

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