Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘businesses in Hamilton’

It is my conclusion that the Atkinson Hotel was originally called the Misener Commercial Hotel, because:

  1. Chester Clay Atkinson died in December, 1956. According to his obituary from a Hamilton newspaper, the Atkinsons sold their hotel to First Baptist Church in August, 1955.
  2. The obituary says that the Atkinsons bought the “Hamilton Hotel” in 1925. The 1934 article said that they “built up an attractive and superior small hotel patronage” rather than saying that they erected the building in which the hotel was located.
  3. Edwin Ruthvin Misener moved to Dallas in 1922.
  4. When Edwin Ruthvin and Sarah E. Misener celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in 1911–they lived on South Bell
  5. The shape of the roof, location of chimneys, second-floor railings, and 2nd floor windows and door are too similar for it not to be the same building.
    The Atkinson Hotel after it had been purchased by First Baptist Church in 1955.

    The Atkinson Hotel after it had been purchased by First Baptist Church in 1955.

    The Misener Commercial Hotel c. 1900-1922

    The Misener Commercial Hotel c. 1900-1922.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Misner Hotel

Edwin Ruthvin & Sarah Elizabeth (Collett) Misener operated this hotel in Hamilton for many years.  Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker

Edwin Ruthvin & Sarah Elizabeth (Collett) Misener operated this hotel in Hamilton for many years. Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker

Smith-Harris Lumber Co

x

Smith-Harris Lumber Company before 1912. Contributed by Nancy Ellen (Davis) Stonebraker.

Charles Martin Hickman was an accountant with this firm

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church is in the left background, and a Hamilton School building is in the right background.  The rock fence in the foreground  remains in front of the house built in 1872 by Francis Marion Graves on what is now West Ross Street.

Between the two Smith-Harris Lumber Company Buildings is a Rock Island Railroad car on the Stephenville North and South Texas Railroad Tracks.  The SN & ST Railroad depot is behind the Smith-Harris Lumber Company Building on the left.

Haskell Harelik Dry Goods

harelik1

Excerpt from the 1938 Pioneer Edition Hamilton County News, Vol 8 No. & The Carlton Citizen, Vol. 30 No. 23, Originally published Friday, 24 June  1938, W. F. Billingslea, Publisher, Hamilton County, TX:

During these 27 years we have had business contact with 90 per cent of the people of Hamilton County at some time or other.  We located here with the idea of making this our permanent home and started in a small way.  In every business transaction since that time we have endeavored to make each buyer a satisfied customer by giving him 100 cents in valuable merchandise for every dollar spent with us and rendering prompt and efficient service.  This has paid us dividends in increased business and made us many friends throughout the territory.  We appreciate this and in return will continue to serve you with “The Best At the Least Possible Cost.”

From Milton Harelik, 6 August 2002: Milton Harelik is the son of Haskell Harlik. Milton’s son Mark wrote a play The Immigrant based upon his Grandfather’s life.

The Harelik Store history dates back to 19ll when Mr. Perry rented a north side building to Papa when he opened up his grocery store. That was in the era when all the north side saloons were closed and there were a few empty buildings. In 1924 he bought out a Mrs. Paul Harelik who was running what they called “The Racket Store”. Her husband, a 3rd cousin of Papa’s had died the previous year and she decided to move to San Francisco. Then in 1939, (before #WW2) a decision was made to remodel the store and Mrs. Ethel Kooken (Dr. Kooken’s mother) offered to build a place to our specifications and we moved to the north side in 1940. Mark’s  story about Papa depicts a lot of that history in his play, The Immigrant.

Read Full Post »